What makes good Italian food and a great Italian restaurant? This is what I think.

Italy has a wonderful tradition of fine culinary. Italian food’s importance to Italian culture shouldn’t be overstated. It is among the central elements, and why shouldn’t it be? Think about Italy’s geography for a second:

It runs the distance from north to south. Therefore, it possesses a great wide array of growing seasons and soil types. This means a rich diversity of ingredients for food.

It is a peninsula, meaning can nearly surrounded with sea but also connected to fantastic Eurasian land aggregate. There is an abundance of fresh seafood and foreign ingredients from neighboring lands.

It sits between Europe and Africa in the Mediterranean. All Mediterranean cultures have excellent food traditions from North Africa to Lebanon and Israel, France, Greece, Spain and, of course, Italy.

When you think of noodles and pasta, you probably think of Italy, but those wonderful inventions began to Italy from China thanks to Marco Polo. It reveals a lot about Italian food culture that something so basic became along with Italy even though it did not originate there.

Anyway, food is often a key element of Italian culture. Therefore, the food is probably the most important part of the restaurant. Of course, a great Italian restaurant will have a great wine list, a clean and elegant decor, and wonderful service, but a good Italian restaurant will immediately get by on great food alone, despite the fact that they have a crummy wine list, poor service, also dingy decoration schemes.

By the way, if you leave an “Italian” restaurant hungry, it’s far from authentic. A white tablecloth and high bill do not a great bistro establish. Frankly, I can’t stand those fancy Italian restaurants in Manhattan that cost you $400 for a morsel that makes you want to stop for a slice of pizza during your studies home. A great Italian ristorante will leave you full, not stuffed, but full.

The second involving a great Italian restaurant is there isn’t a. The service will be warm and professional, but not overly friendly. Wedding ceremony orders are taken and the meal gets rolling, 200 dollars per month should be nearly invisible. Run — don’t walk — from any Italian restaurant where the waitperson address the table like this:

“How you guys doin’ at some point?” when ladies are seated while dining. This is most un-Italian of them. An Italian would never call women “guy.” Even in spaghetti-and-meatballs-type places, the waiter might say, “How is everyone for dinner?” The won’t tarry with small talk in the white-tablecloth places, not fortunately ones, however. It is all about the meal likewise comfort.

The third aspect of a great Italian restaurant is the ambiance. I’m not sure what it is, but Italians seem to be able to build a wonderful atmosphere anywhere. I have eaten at places in strip malls in the suburban areas of Denver — as un-romantic an environment as considerably more — arrive close to great. An actually outstanding Italian restaurant will just have a certain feeling from the instant you walk in the door, a warmth and the glow that can’t be described.

So the priorities are food first, service second, and a ambiance third. If all three are met, you say that a great Italian eating venue.

Ciro & Sal’s

4 Kiley Ct, Provincetown, MA 02657

(508) 487-6444

https://g.page/Ciro-and-Sals-Italian-Restaurant